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Tonight we will work through each of the canons of the councils that refutes the Vatican 1 dogma of papal supremacy. If the papal dogma of Vatican 1 was the perennial view, it should not be contradicted by multiple canons in each council. As Vatican 1 states: "For "no one can be in doubt, indeed it was known in every age that the holy and most blessed Peter, prince and head of the apostles, the pillar of faith and the foundation of the Catholic Church, received the keys of the kingdom from our lord Jesus Christ, the savior and redeemer of the human race, and that to this day and for ever he lives" and presides and "exercises judgment in his successors" the bishops of the Holy Roman See, which he founded and consecrated with his blood." The text, ignoring all context for these events and quote-mines, then follows with a non sequitur based on a misuse of a quote from Pope St. Leo, and by creatively pasting the two quotes together, Vatican 1 spins a narrative of Ephesus and Pope St. Leo retroactively affirming the supremacy dogma outlined centuries later at Vatican 1: "Therefore whoever succeeds to the chair of Peter obtains by the institution of Christ himself, the primacy of Peter over the whole Church. "So what the truth has ordained stands firm, and blessed Peter perseveres in the rock-like strength he was granted, and does not abandon that guidance of the Church which he once received" In terms of the canons, the argument is not that canons are "infallible" per se nor that canons are irreformable, but that canons certainly express the collective mind of the church in these various councils. To deflect to the issue of whether canons are infallible is to miss the argument. The argument is that Vatican 1 claims its view is the ancient, perennial view of the Church, and if that is the case, we should not see canons enacted at every ecumenical council in the first 7 centuries that contradict this view. The mere fact these canons exist is proof the mindset of Vatican 1 was not the mindset of the fathers in each of these centuries. This is precisely one of the many reasons the modern day Vatican has admitted the modus operandi of the church in the first millennium was collegial, and not the Vatican 1 papal monarchy. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/jay-sanalysis--1423846/support.
Tonight we will work through each of the canons of the councils that refutes the Vatican 1 dogma of papal supremacy. If the papal dogma of Vatican 1 was the perennial view, it should not be contradicted by multiple canons in each council. As Vatican 1 states: "For "no one can be in doubt, indeed it was known in every age that the holy and most blessed Peter, prince and head of the apostles, the pillar of faith and the foundation of the Catholic Church, received the keys of the kingdom from our lord Jesus Christ, the savior and redeemer of the human race, and that to this day and for ever he lives" and presides and "exercises judgment in his successors" the bishops of the Holy Roman See, which he founded and consecrated with his blood." The text, ignoring all context for these events and quote-mines, then follows with a non sequitur based on a misuse of a quote from Pope St. Leo, and by creatively pasting the two quotes together, Vatican 1 spins a narrative of Ephesus and Pope St. Leo retroactively affirming the supremacy dogma outlined centuries later at Vatican 1: "Therefore whoever succeeds to the chair of Peter obtains by the institution of Christ himself, the primacy of Peter over the whole Church. "So what the truth has ordained stands firm, and blessed Peter perseveres in the rock-like strength he was granted, and does not abandon that guidance of the Church which he once received" In terms of the canons, the argument is not that canons are "infallible" per se nor that canons are irreformable, but that canons certainly express the collective mind of the church in these various councils. To deflect to the issue of whether canons are infallible is to miss the argument. The argument is that Vatican 1 claims its view is the ancient, perennial view of the Church, and if that is the case, we should not see canons enacted at every ecumenical council in the first 7 centuries that contradict this view. The mere fact these canons exist is proof the mindset of Vatican 1 was not the mindset of the fathers in each of these centuries. This is precisely one of the many reasons the modern day Vatican has admitted the modus operandi of the church in the first millennium was collegial, and not the Vatican 1 papal monarchy. read more read less

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