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In this episode I chat with Andy Hailey, Director of Swimming at Brighton College, about his unique coaching philosophy and innovative training techniques. In this episode, we dive into the world of ecological dynamics, constraint-led approaches, and the benefits of implicit learning in swimming. Andy shares how his journey, from a PE teacher to an aquatics professional, has been shaped by key mentors like Rick Shuttelworth, and Andy Kirkland, who have helped him challenge traditional beliefs and techniques in swim coaching.

Andy's journey has been shaped by key moments in his career, such as when Andrew Kirkland challenged him to explain how he individualises his coaching. Andy has learnt to challenge his own beliefs, and how energy systems and skillful swimming techniques can be used to help younger athletes reach their full potential.

We discuss the challenge of energy-based sports and how Andy, has been an outlier in the aquatics world. We talk about the importance of intention in coaching, and how constraints can help with skillful swimming. We also look at how the LTAD model can contribute to burnout, and how governing bodies are increasingly looking to an aquatics-focused rather than swimming-focused approach.

We explore the concept of a reductionist approach to getting a strong kick. Changing the focus can help keep motivation up, as well as the idea of using heart rate and time to help swimmers find their cruiseing speed and learn to listen to their heart. We also discuss a golf set, and how the constraints of stroke rate and time can help athletes maximize propulsion from each stroke.

We discuss the concept of co-design in swimming and how it can be used to give swimmers more freedom and control over their training. We explore the challenge of introducing swimmers to a new culture and setting, and how this can require more individualization. We consider the benefits of structure and order for some swimmers, and how this can be balanced with the need for expression in team sports. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/the-talent-equation-podcast--2186775/support.
In this episode I chat with Andy Hailey, Director of Swimming at Brighton College, about his unique coaching philosophy and innovative training techniques. In this episode, we dive into the world of ecological dynamics, constraint-led approaches, and the benefits of implicit learning in swimming. Andy shares how his journey, from a PE teacher to an aquatics professional, has been shaped by key mentors like Rick Shuttelworth, and Andy Kirkland, who have helped him challenge traditional beliefs and techniques in swim coaching. Andy's journey has been shaped by key moments in his career, such as when Andrew Kirkland challenged him to explain how he individualises his coaching. Andy has learnt to challenge his own beliefs, and how energy systems and skillful swimming techniques can be used to help younger athletes reach their full potential. We discuss the challenge of energy-based sports and how Andy, has been an outlier in the aquatics world. We talk about the importance of intention in coaching, and how constraints can help with skillful swimming. We also look at how the LTAD model can contribute to burnout, and how governing bodies are increasingly looking to an aquatics-focused rather than swimming-focused approach. We explore the concept of a reductionist approach to getting a strong kick. Changing the focus can help keep motivation up, as well as the idea of using heart rate and time to help swimmers find their cruiseing speed and learn to listen to their heart. We also discuss a golf set, and how the constraints of stroke rate and time can help athletes maximize propulsion from each stroke. We discuss the concept of co-design in swimming and how it can be used to give swimmers more freedom and control over their training. We explore the challenge of introducing swimmers to a new culture and setting, and how this can require more individualization. We consider the benefits of structure and order for some swimmers, and how this can be balanced with the need for expression in team sports. read more read less

9 months ago #aquatics, #coaching, #skill-acquisition, #swimming, #talent-development