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Space Nuts

  • #417: Solar Flares & Speedy Spacecraft: Revolutionizing Our Cosmic Commute

    16 MAY 2024 · This episode is brought to you with the support of NordVPN. Every Internet connected device deserves to have NordVPN for it's online safety. To check out the special Space  Nuts deal for you as a listener, visit https://www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they embark on another fascinating journey through the cosmos in the latest episode of Space Nuts. In this installment, the duo delves into a myriad of space phenomena, starting with the most significant solar flare in nearly a decade. They discuss the stunning auroral displays that resulted from this solar outburst and the potential impacts such events can have on our technology.Next, they celebrate a milestone for the Mars rover Perseverance, which has spent over 1000 days (or sols) on the Red Planet. The conversation explores the significance of the samples collected by Perseverance, including those that may contain ancient signs of life, and the future plans for their retrieval.The episode then propels into the future of space travel with NASA's innovative plasma rocket concept, which promises to cut travel time to Mars significantly. Andrew and Fred unpack the potential of this high-efficiency propulsion system and what it could mean for human exploration of the Red Planet.Finally, the pair examines a colossal protoplanetary disc discovery, the largest ever observed, which could herald the formation of some of the most massive planets we've ever seen. They ponder the possibilities of planet formation, the emergence of life, and the long-term evolution of these cosmic systems.From solar spectacles and Martian milestones to revolutionary rockets and planetary potential, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic cornucopia of astronomical insights. Tune in and let your imagination soar as we continue to uncover the secrets of the universe. 00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley talks about budgets and dog issues on this week's Space Nuts 00:02:31 The biggest solar flare in nearly a decade has just passed over the earth 00:06:58 Perseverance mission to look for signs of past life on Mars 00:14:22 Andrew Freedman says he could rerelease World War One audio under Australian copyright 00:16:49 A proposed plasma rocket would cut the travel time to Mars to two months 00:24:09 Fred: Have you seen a house before they build it 00:25:47 New infrared observations show giant edge on protoplanetary disc 00:32:10 Space Nuts podcast available at Apple Podcasts, Spotify and iHeartRadio Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    36m 29s
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    #417-418 Premium: From Solar Spectacles to Speedy Spacecraft: Pushing Boundaries Beyond the Red Planet

    16 MAY 2024 · Embark on an astronomical odyssey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they delve into the latest celestial phenomena on this episode of Space Nuts. The show kicks off with a discussion on the most intense solar flare in nearly a decade, lighting up the skies with breathtaking auroras and raising concerns about potential impacts on our tech-reliant world. Next, the duo celebrates a Martian milestone: Perseverance rover's 1000 days on the Red Planet. Discover the scientific treasures unearthed by this intrepid explorer, from intriguing rock samples to the pivotal role of its aerial companion, Ingenuity. Then, strap in for a journey through the possibilities of advanced space travel as NASA's innovative plasma rocket concept promises to slash Mars travel time from nine months to a mere two months. Could this be the breakthrough we need for the next giant leap in interplanetary exploration?Finally, peer into the cosmic cradle of a giant protoplanetary disc, the largest ever observed. This discovery could herald the birth of massive new worlds, offering a glimpse into the early stages of planet formation and the boundless potential of the universe.From solar spectacles to Martian marvels and the promise of faster space travel, this episode of Space Nuts is a testament to the relentless pursuit of knowledge that propels humanity beyond the final frontier.00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley talks about budgets and dog issues on this week's Space Nuts 00:02:31 The biggest solar flare in nearly a decade has just passed over the earth 00:06:58 The perseverance rover is now past 1000 days on the red planet 00:14:27 Andrew says he could rerelease audio from World War One book under Australian copyright 00:16:49 A proposed plasma rocket would cut the travel time to Mars to two months 00:24:07 Fred: Have you seen a house before they build it 00:25:45 New observations show giant edge on protoplanetary disc around distant star 00:31:21 Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson answering questions about light 00:33:03 First question comes from Alan from medicine Hat, Canada 00:35:14 There is no known limit to how far light can travel 00:37:33 Charles: What do you think of the theory that we live in a holographic universe 00:44:10 What if the hologram is made of dark matter 00:45:26 If all universes are expanding, would they eventually overlap 00:49:07 Craig Miller calls from sunny Marambula in New South Wales 00:50:30 How much speed can drag create depending on concentration of particles in spaceJoin us on this interstellar voyage by supporting Space Nuts at https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the cosmos. Clear skies and bold explorations await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    Play
    58m 11s
  • #416: Cosmic Conundrums & Astral Assemblies: Tackling the Universe's Toughest Questions

    13 MAY 2024 · Prepare for a cosmic deep dive into the enigmatic world of black holes and stellar mysteries on this Q&A episode of Space Nuts.  Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson answer burning questions from the Space Nuts community, starting with a head-scratcher about black holes and magnetic fields. Can these gravitational giants possess magnetic fields, and if so, how do they influence the spectacular jets seen emanating from quasars? The duo untangles the complex relationship between rotation, charge, and magnetism. Next, Pete from sunny Sheffield queries the stellar classification mnemonic "Oh, Be A Fine Girl, Kiss Me" and its implications. How do the proportions of these star types stack up in the Milky Way, and do these ratios hold true across other galaxies? The conversation illuminates the cosmic census of star types, from the rare, scorching O stars to the ubiquitous, cooler M dwarfs. Listeners also get a personal touch as Michael from Kent inquires about Fred's most standout project over his illustrious career. Fred shares insights into his contributions to groundbreaking surveys and reminisces about the influential projects that have shaped our understanding of the universe. Rounding off the episode, Rusty from Donnybrook seeks to understand why fogbows are white rather than exhibiting the vibrant hues of a typical rainbow. The answer lies in the intricate interplay of light refraction, dispersion, and the often-overlooked diffraction in tiny water droplets. From the nature of magnetic fields in the abyss of black holes to the distribution of stars across the cosmos, this episode of Space Nuts is a treasure trove of astronomical knowledge. Tune in as Andrew and Fred navigate the celestial curiosities that keep us gazing skyward with wonder. 00:00:00 Professor Fred Watson answers your questions on this edition of Space Nuts 00:02:31 Robert from the Netherlands says black holes do not have a magnetic field 00:09:15 Three questions from Pete Ellinger on different types of stars 00:15:08 Metallicity, the amount of iron in a star, varies across galaxies 00:16:59 If there was a project that you could have worked on past or present, what 00:25:21 The hippie telescope was a big leap forward from the existing telescope 00:25:47 Final question, Fred, comes from Rusty in Donnybrook about fog bows Support Space Nuts and join us on this journey through the stars by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Your contributions help us continue our mission to answer the universe's most perplexing questions. Clear skies and boundless curiosity await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    30m 50s
  • #415: From Starliner's Slip to Lunar Lights: A Glimpse into Tomorrow's Space Tech

    9 MAY 2024 · Embark on a lunar adventure with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this episode of Space Nuts, as they delve into the challenges and innovations surrounding our celestial neighbor, the Moon. First up, the duo discusses the recent setbacks of Boeing's Starliner, a spacecraft that faced yet another delay just moments before its much-anticipated launch. What went wrong this time, and what does it mean for the future of crewed missions?Next, they illuminate the idea of using mirrors to shine sunlight into the permanently shadowed craters of the Moon's South Pole. With the potential of harvesting water ice for resources, could this reflective solution be the key to sustaining future lunar bases?Then, celebrate a special anniversary with the team as they highlight ten years of HIPPI, the High Precision Polarimetric Instrument, and its incredible contributions to astronomy. From tracking magnetic fields in distant galaxies to the possibility of detecting rainbows on exoplanets, HIPPI's decade of discovery is truly something to cheer about.Finally, the conversation turns to Earth as Andrew and Fred explore how satellites are revolutionizing agriculture by predicting crop yields from space. This technology holds promise for farmers around the globe, especially in the face of changing climate conditions.From the intricacies of space technology to the practical applications of satellite data, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic journey that connects the farthest reaches of the universe to the down-to-earth matters of daily life. Tune in and let your curiosity take flight.00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley: Space nuts podcast about astronomy and space science 00:01:30 Launch of Boeing Starliner scheduled for Friday has been scrubbed 00:04:47 Andrew Webb: There's a lot of interest in the moon right now 00:10:41 A valley in Norway has a mirror that doesn't see the sun 00:14:56 Andrew Dunkley: Hipie is the high precision polarimetric instrument 00:20:45 Polarising sunglasses can detect rainbows with incredibly high precision 00:25:40 Fred Geyer explores the use of satellites to predict crop yieldsSupport Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Don't miss out on future episodes as we continue to decode the universe's grandest puzzles. Clear skies and bold questions await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    33m 31s
  • Supporters Club

    #415-416 Premium: Starliner's Stumble & Lunar Luminosity: Reflecting on Space's Latest Feats

    9 MAY 2024 · Embark on a cosmic journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they unravel the latest space conundrums on Space Nuts. In this episode, they delve into the trials and tribulations of Boeing's Starliner – a spacecraft that's faced its fair share of setbacks. Will the next launch finally see it dock with the International Space Station, or will the stars remain out of reach for this ambitious vessel?The duo also sheds light on an innovative concept to illuminate the Moon's dark craters using mirrors. Could this ingenious solution unlock the Moon's potential as a base for future space exploration?From Earth's orbit, they turn their gaze to satellites that do more than just circle our planet – they predict crop yields, an advancement that could revolutionize agriculture, especially in the face of climate change.And finally, Space Nuts celebrates a special anniversary – ten years of the High Precision Polarimetric Instrument (HIPPI). Discover how this small yet mighty device has transformed our understanding of distant magnetic fields and even the potential to detect rainbows on exoplanets.Join Andrew and Fred as they tackle these topics and more, providing insights that only seasoned space enthusiasts can offer. It's an episode not to be missed by anyone who looks up at the night sky with wonder.00:00:00 - Andrew Dunkley hosts Space Nuts podcast about astronomy and space science 00:01:33 - Launch of Boeing's Starliner scheduled for Friday has been scrubbed 00:04:49 - Andrew Webb: There's a lot of interest in the moon right now 00:10:47 - Professor Fred Watson: There is a valley in Norway that doesn't see sun 00:15:19 - Hippo is an acronym for high precision, um, polarimetric instrument 00:16:28 - Hippy was first used on the Anglo australian telescope 00:24:56 - Hippy is capable of detecting rainbows in atmospheres of exoplanets 00:25:54 - Use of satellites to predict crop yields is becoming increasingly feasible 00:32:14 - Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson on Space nuts 00:33:51 - Robert from the Netherlands says black holes may have magnetic fields 00:40:25 - Three questions from Pete Ellinger about different star types across galaxies 00:46:34 - Metallicity, the amount of iron in a star, varies across galaxies 00:48:08 - Michael from Kent asks Professor Watson what project stood out for him most 00:56:39 - Yeah, that's one of the good ones are. It's a bit like hippie 00:56:56 - Fred asks why fog bows are white and not a rainbow
    Play
    1h 1m 59s
  • #414: Stellar Collisions & Invisible Invitations: Unveiling the Universe's Secrets

    6 MAY 2024 · Prepare for an interstellar Q&A session with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson on this episode of Space Nuts. We're answering cosmic queries from the Space Nuts audience, starting with James's fascination with the elusive Planet Nine. Could this potential new member of our solar system already have a name waiting in the wings, or will its discoverer have the honor of christening it?Next, Lloyd from Cairns wonders about celestial smash-ups, but not the kind involving black holes or neutron stars. What happens when ordinary stars collide? Do they dance a destructive tango, or can they merge into something grander? The duo delves into the fiery fates of these stellar encounters.Rennie probes the electromagnetic forces at play in the universe, from the behavior of light to the magnetic fields of galaxies. What role does electromagnetism play on other planets, and what happens to worlds lacking this fundamental force? Fred illuminates the subject with his astrophysical expertise.Finally, Ron poses a thought-provoking question: If alien scientists were observing Earth, could they detect signs of life from afar? And conversely, could we spot the telltale signs of extraterrestrial existence on a distant exoplanet? The answers might just redefine our search for cosmic companions.From naming planets to star collisions, electromagnetic enigmas, and the search for life beyond Earth, this episode of Space Nuts is an exploration of the curiosities that light up our universe. Tune in for these mind-expanding discussions and remember to send in your astronomical questions for a chance to be featured on the show.Support our cosmic journey by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Your contributions help us continue our mission to unravel the mysteries of the stars. Until next time, keep your eyes on the skies and your curiosity boundless.00:00:00 Questions from James, Lloyd and Ron on this episode of Space Nuts 00:01:13 Andrew and Fred met Kate and Jeremy on the Canadian train for the eclipse 00:03:04 Andrew: Get your iPad to read the book rather than struggling through it 00:05:38 Planet nine, should such a thing be discovered? Or would the individual decide 00:12:48 Do normal everyday stars like our sun ever collide and what do they create 00:16:54 Do galaxies as a whole have electromagnetism 00:23:14 If scientists in distant solar system were searching for exoplanets using modern technology 00:30:08 Send us your questions via our website, spacenutspodcast. comSpace Nuts – your ticket to the universe. Join us each week as we make the cosmos your backyard
    32m 25s
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    #413-414 Premium: Hubble's Hiccups & The Gamma Ray Enigma: Deciphering the Universe's Luminous Puzzles

    2 MAY 2024 · Embark on an astronomical journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this captivating episode of Space Nuts. The cosmic conundrum that is the Hubble Space Telescope faces familiar challenges once again, with its gyroscopes causing a stir and casting it into safe mode. Fred delves into the history and potential future of this venerable eye in the sky, as NASA engineers contemplate a future where Hubble may have to operate at a reduced efficiency.Next, the duo spins into a discussion about the fastest rotating asteroid ever observed, 2024 BX1, which hurtled towards Earth and disintegrated in our atmosphere, leaving behind a trail of clues for scientists to unravel. With a rotation period clocked at an astonishing 2.588 seconds, this space rock set a new record and provided a meteoric spectacle for those fortunate enough to witness its fiery demise.Finally, Andrew and Fred explore the enigmatic world of gamma ray bursts, those fleeting yet fiercely powerful cosmic events that have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in 1967. A new breakthrough hints at the possibility that these bursts are not only symmetrical but may also be the result of laterally moving jets, offering a tantalizing glimpse into the mechanics of these astronomical phenomena.From the trials and tribulations of the Hubble to the rapid revolutions of an asteroid and the perplexing properties of gamma ray bursts, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic voyage through the mysteries of space. Tune in to unravel the universe's most intriguing puzzles and remember, the cosmos is always full of surprises.00:00:00 - Coming up on this episode of Space nuts is Hubble having trouble again 00:02:32 - Gyroscopes are what let Hubble telescope point in the right direction 00:07:38 - An asteroid was detected 3 hours before it hit the earth's atmosphere 00:14:06 - Professor Fred Watson says four polish meteorite hunters found some fragments 00:15:45 - Gamma ray bursts were discovered accidentally in 1967 but scientists have been studying them since 00:20:16 - Gamma ray bursts also have light curves which are completely symmetrical 00:26:45 - Fred: I'm still trying to get my head around these things 00:28:54 - Professor Fred Watson answers questions from James, lloyd and Ron 00:29:50 - Kate and Jeremy met Andrew and Fred on the Canadian train for the eclipse 00:31:31 - Fred Watson: Get your iPad to read book rather than struggling through it 00:34:03 - Planet nine, should such a thing be discovered? Does the individual get a say 00:40:53 - Do normal everyday stars like our sun ever collide and what do they create 00:44:43 - Do galaxies as a whole have electromagnetism 00:51:13 - If scientists in distant solar system were searching for exoplanets using modern technology 00:58:44 - Andrew Dunster: Thanks to everyone who sent questions inSupport the podcast and expand your knowledge of the universe by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Subscribe for more celestial insights with Space Nuts, where every episode brings you closer to the stars. Until our next stellar encounter, keep your eyes on the skies and your curiosity ever-expanding.
    Play
    1h 19s
  • #413: Hubble's Hiccups & The Swiftest Space Spinner: Unraveling Cosmic Conundrums

    2 MAY 2024 · This episode of Space Nuts is brought to you with the help of NordVPN...online security with a 30 day money-back guarantee. To check out our special deal for you, visit https://www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts Dive into the cosmic unknown with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson on this episode of Space Nuts, as they explore the latest hiccups of the venerable Hubble Space Telescope. Despite its unparalleled success over the past 34 years, Hubble is once more grappling with gyroscopic glitches that threaten to reduce its celestial observations' efficiency. Can NASA engineers coax Hubble back to its full cosmic potential?Next, join the duo as they delve into the mystery of the fastest spinning asteroid ever discovered, 2024 BX1. Detected a mere three hours before it streaked through Earth's atmosphere, this diminutive space rock has set a new record for rapid rotation, completing a turn every 2.6 seconds. Learn how meteorite hunters in Poland managed to snag fragments of this celestial speedster, offering us a rare close-up of an asteroidal visitor.Finally, Andrew and Fred illuminate the perplexing world of gamma-ray bursts, those enigmatic flashes of light that outshine entire galaxies in mere seconds. With a new breakthrough in understanding their light curves, scientists are unraveling the symmetrical patterns of these bursts, revealing insights into the relativistic jets that propel them across the universe. Could this be the key to decoding one of the cosmos' most powerful phenomena?From the trials of Hubble to the swift twirl of an asteroid and the cryptic luminance of gamma-ray bursts, this episode of Space Nuts is a journey through the marvels and mysteries of our vast universe. Tune in and let your imagination soar to the farthest reaches of space and time.00:00:00 This is Space nuts. Coming up on this episode, Hubble having trouble again 00:02:31 Gyros at the Hubble space telescope have failed again but it's not fatal 00:07:38 An asteroid was detected 3 hours before it hit the earth's atmosphere 00:13:58 Professor Fred Watson says meteorite fragments were found before it hit earth 00:15:49 Gamma ray bursts were discovered accidentally in 1967 but scientists have been studying them since 00:20:20 Gamma ray bursts also have light curves which are completely symmetrical 00:26:46 Fred Dunkley: FRBs release huge amounts of energy in a short timeSupport Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Don't miss out on future episodes as we continue to decode the universe's grandest puzzles. Clear skies and bold questions await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    34m 28s
  • #412: Cosmic Queries: A Voyage to Voyager & Defending Astronauts Beyond Earth

    28 APR 2024 · Prepare to illuminate the mysteries of cosmic luminescence with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this enlightening Q&A episode of Space Nuts. Our stellar duo navigates the void to answer Lee from New York's luminary question: How much light is there in space? Could we see Voyager 1 in its distant travels, or would it merely be a shadow against the cosmic tapestry? Fred sheds light on the subject, revealing the surprising capabilities of the human eye in the darkest reaches. Next, Fenton from Minnesota proposes an ingenious method for shielding astronauts from the relentless radiation beyond the Van Allen Belts. Could a miniaturized version of these protective fields be the key to safe space exploration? Fred unpacks the complexities of cosmic radiation and the futuristic technologies that might one day safeguard our interstellar voyagers. Robert from Vienna ponders a parallel universe where our moon is not the cratered time capsule we know, but an icy or hazy sphere like Europa or Titan. Would our understanding of the solar system's history be drastically different? And would astronauts have dared to tread on such enigmatic surfaces? The answers might just surprise you. Finally, Duncan from Weymouth queries the nomenclature of the outer planets, challenging the distinction between 'ice giants' and 'rock giants.' Fred clarifies the frosty moniker, explaining why Uranus and Neptune's chilly atmospheres earn them this cool classification. From the potency of starlight to the protective puzzles of space travel, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic cornucopia of knowledge. Remember to share your own astronomical inquiries via the Space Nuts website, and join us as we continue to unravel the universe's most perplexing enigmas. Until we next embark on our celestial sojourn, keep pondering the heavens and stay tuned for more galactic revelations. Support our journey through the cosmos by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Your support helps us keep the starlight shining on these interstellar discussions. Until the next transmission, keep your telescopes trained and your curiosity alight. This episode is brought to you with the support of NordPass...the password manager you need to make life less stressful...and by using our special deal...for not very much money. Plus you'll be helping support our show. For details visit https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass
    26m 19s
  • #411: Aussie Astronaut Adventures & Jovian Journeys: Unveiling Space's Latest Marvels

    25 APR 2024 · Embark on an astronomical adventure with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in the latest episode of Space Nuts, where they celebrate a historic moment for Australia with the announcement of the nation's first female astronaut, Catherine Bennell Pegg. Discover her remarkable journey to the stars and the aspirations she harbors for future Australian spacefarers. Then, take a volcanic voyage to Jupiter's moon Io with Juno's latest flybys, revealing a lava lake in Loki Patera so vast and smooth it mirrors the gas giant itself. Marvel at the newly dubbed Steeple Mountain, a geological spire that evokes Earth's own gothic cathedrals, and ponder the mysterious forces sculpting Io's tumultuous terrain. The episode continues to probe the secrets of the Solar System as Juno also sheds light on Jupiter's elusive water content, challenging previous theories about the giant planet's formation. And finally, the duo turns their gaze to Mars, where a new theory suggests that humans may inadvertently be unearthing the Red Planet's methane mysteries with the tread of rovers. From celebrating trailblazing astronauts to unraveling the enigmas of alien worlds, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic journey not to be missed. Tune in for these interstellar stories, and remember to bring your curiosity as we explore the wonders of our universe. Support the podcast and unlock a universe of knowledge by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Don't forget to subscribe for more deep space discoveries and celestial insights with Space Nuts, where the cosmos is just a play button away. Until our next cosmic rendezvous, keep your eyes to the skies and your questions at the ready. And for your daily space news fix, check out the team at our sister podcast 'Astronomy Daily the Podcast. Available wherever you get podcasts or stream from the website at https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/
    29m 41s
  • Supporters Club

    #417-418 Premium: From Solar Spectacles to Speedy Spacecraft: Pushing Boundaries Beyond the Red Planet

    16 MAY 2024 · Embark on an astronomical odyssey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they delve into the latest celestial phenomena on this episode of Space Nuts. The show kicks off with a discussion on the most intense solar flare in nearly a decade, lighting up the skies with breathtaking auroras and raising concerns about potential impacts on our tech-reliant world. Next, the duo celebrates a Martian milestone: Perseverance rover's 1000 days on the Red Planet. Discover the scientific treasures unearthed by this intrepid explorer, from intriguing rock samples to the pivotal role of its aerial companion, Ingenuity. Then, strap in for a journey through the possibilities of advanced space travel as NASA's innovative plasma rocket concept promises to slash Mars travel time from nine months to a mere two months. Could this be the breakthrough we need for the next giant leap in interplanetary exploration?Finally, peer into the cosmic cradle of a giant protoplanetary disc, the largest ever observed. This discovery could herald the birth of massive new worlds, offering a glimpse into the early stages of planet formation and the boundless potential of the universe.From solar spectacles to Martian marvels and the promise of faster space travel, this episode of Space Nuts is a testament to the relentless pursuit of knowledge that propels humanity beyond the final frontier.00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley talks about budgets and dog issues on this week's Space Nuts 00:02:31 The biggest solar flare in nearly a decade has just passed over the earth 00:06:58 The perseverance rover is now past 1000 days on the red planet 00:14:27 Andrew says he could rerelease audio from World War One book under Australian copyright 00:16:49 A proposed plasma rocket would cut the travel time to Mars to two months 00:24:07 Fred: Have you seen a house before they build it 00:25:45 New observations show giant edge on protoplanetary disc around distant star 00:31:21 Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson answering questions about light 00:33:03 First question comes from Alan from medicine Hat, Canada 00:35:14 There is no known limit to how far light can travel 00:37:33 Charles: What do you think of the theory that we live in a holographic universe 00:44:10 What if the hologram is made of dark matter 00:45:26 If all universes are expanding, would they eventually overlap 00:49:07 Craig Miller calls from sunny Marambula in New South Wales 00:50:30 How much speed can drag create depending on concentration of particles in spaceJoin us on this interstellar voyage by supporting Space Nuts at https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the cosmos. Clear skies and bold explorations await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    Play
    58m 11s
  • Supporters Club

    #415-416 Premium: Starliner's Stumble & Lunar Luminosity: Reflecting on Space's Latest Feats

    9 MAY 2024 · Embark on a cosmic journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they unravel the latest space conundrums on Space Nuts. In this episode, they delve into the trials and tribulations of Boeing's Starliner – a spacecraft that's faced its fair share of setbacks. Will the next launch finally see it dock with the International Space Station, or will the stars remain out of reach for this ambitious vessel?The duo also sheds light on an innovative concept to illuminate the Moon's dark craters using mirrors. Could this ingenious solution unlock the Moon's potential as a base for future space exploration?From Earth's orbit, they turn their gaze to satellites that do more than just circle our planet – they predict crop yields, an advancement that could revolutionize agriculture, especially in the face of climate change.And finally, Space Nuts celebrates a special anniversary – ten years of the High Precision Polarimetric Instrument (HIPPI). Discover how this small yet mighty device has transformed our understanding of distant magnetic fields and even the potential to detect rainbows on exoplanets.Join Andrew and Fred as they tackle these topics and more, providing insights that only seasoned space enthusiasts can offer. It's an episode not to be missed by anyone who looks up at the night sky with wonder.00:00:00 - Andrew Dunkley hosts Space Nuts podcast about astronomy and space science 00:01:33 - Launch of Boeing's Starliner scheduled for Friday has been scrubbed 00:04:49 - Andrew Webb: There's a lot of interest in the moon right now 00:10:47 - Professor Fred Watson: There is a valley in Norway that doesn't see sun 00:15:19 - Hippo is an acronym for high precision, um, polarimetric instrument 00:16:28 - Hippy was first used on the Anglo australian telescope 00:24:56 - Hippy is capable of detecting rainbows in atmospheres of exoplanets 00:25:54 - Use of satellites to predict crop yields is becoming increasingly feasible 00:32:14 - Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson on Space nuts 00:33:51 - Robert from the Netherlands says black holes may have magnetic fields 00:40:25 - Three questions from Pete Ellinger about different star types across galaxies 00:46:34 - Metallicity, the amount of iron in a star, varies across galaxies 00:48:08 - Michael from Kent asks Professor Watson what project stood out for him most 00:56:39 - Yeah, that's one of the good ones are. It's a bit like hippie 00:56:56 - Fred asks why fog bows are white and not a rainbow
    Play
    1h 1m 59s
  • Supporters Club

    #413-414 Premium: Hubble's Hiccups & The Gamma Ray Enigma: Deciphering the Universe's Luminous Puzzles

    2 MAY 2024 · Embark on an astronomical journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this captivating episode of Space Nuts. The cosmic conundrum that is the Hubble Space Telescope faces familiar challenges once again, with its gyroscopes causing a stir and casting it into safe mode. Fred delves into the history and potential future of this venerable eye in the sky, as NASA engineers contemplate a future where Hubble may have to operate at a reduced efficiency.Next, the duo spins into a discussion about the fastest rotating asteroid ever observed, 2024 BX1, which hurtled towards Earth and disintegrated in our atmosphere, leaving behind a trail of clues for scientists to unravel. With a rotation period clocked at an astonishing 2.588 seconds, this space rock set a new record and provided a meteoric spectacle for those fortunate enough to witness its fiery demise.Finally, Andrew and Fred explore the enigmatic world of gamma ray bursts, those fleeting yet fiercely powerful cosmic events that have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in 1967. A new breakthrough hints at the possibility that these bursts are not only symmetrical but may also be the result of laterally moving jets, offering a tantalizing glimpse into the mechanics of these astronomical phenomena.From the trials and tribulations of the Hubble to the rapid revolutions of an asteroid and the perplexing properties of gamma ray bursts, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic voyage through the mysteries of space. Tune in to unravel the universe's most intriguing puzzles and remember, the cosmos is always full of surprises.00:00:00 - Coming up on this episode of Space nuts is Hubble having trouble again 00:02:32 - Gyroscopes are what let Hubble telescope point in the right direction 00:07:38 - An asteroid was detected 3 hours before it hit the earth's atmosphere 00:14:06 - Professor Fred Watson says four polish meteorite hunters found some fragments 00:15:45 - Gamma ray bursts were discovered accidentally in 1967 but scientists have been studying them since 00:20:16 - Gamma ray bursts also have light curves which are completely symmetrical 00:26:45 - Fred: I'm still trying to get my head around these things 00:28:54 - Professor Fred Watson answers questions from James, lloyd and Ron 00:29:50 - Kate and Jeremy met Andrew and Fred on the Canadian train for the eclipse 00:31:31 - Fred Watson: Get your iPad to read book rather than struggling through it 00:34:03 - Planet nine, should such a thing be discovered? Does the individual get a say 00:40:53 - Do normal everyday stars like our sun ever collide and what do they create 00:44:43 - Do galaxies as a whole have electromagnetism 00:51:13 - If scientists in distant solar system were searching for exoplanets using modern technology 00:58:44 - Andrew Dunster: Thanks to everyone who sent questions inSupport the podcast and expand your knowledge of the universe by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Subscribe for more celestial insights with Space Nuts, where every episode brings you closer to the stars. Until our next stellar encounter, keep your eyes on the skies and your curiosity ever-expanding.
    Play
    1h 19s
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    #411-412 Premium: Aussie Astronaut, Cosmic Canopies & Methane Magic: Probing the Puzzles of Planetary Phenomena

    25 APR 2024 · Embark on an interstellar journey with host Andrew Dunkley and the sagacious Professor Fred Watson on this enlightening episode of Space Nuts. This week, we celebrate a monumental achievement in Australia's space exploration history with the announcement of the nation's first female astronaut, Catherine Bennell Pegg. Discover her journey to the stars and the rigorous process that led to this historic moment. The duo then sets their sights closer to home, delving into the volcanic wonders of Jupiter's moon, Io. Revel in the descriptions of a lava lake so vast it rivals earthly seas and a mountain so sharply defined it could be mistaken for an earthly cathedral spire. Juno's flybys have brought us face-to-face with these alien landscapes, challenging our understanding of geological processes beyond Earth. Next, we navigate the swirling mysteries of Jupiter itself, exploring the enigmatic water content—or surprising lack thereof—in the gas giant's atmosphere. What does this mean for our understanding of Jupiter's formation and the early solar system? Andrew and Fred unpack the cosmic implications. Finally, the episode takes a speculative turn to Mars, where a curious new theory suggests that human activity might be influencing the detection of methane on the Red Planet. Could our rovers be unearthing secrets from beneath the Martian crust? The discussion probes the depths of this intriguing possibility. From the triumph of human ambition to the perplexing puzzles of our cosmic neighborhood, this episode of Space Nuts is a testament to the relentless pursuit of knowledge. Tune in for these astronomical adventures and ponder the mysteries that await us in the vast expanse of space. Remember to submit your own cosmic conundrums via the Space Nuts website, and join us next time as we continue our voyage through the wonders of the universe. Until then, let curiosity be your guide, and keep your eyes to the skies! And for your daily dose of the latest Space News, check out the team at 'Astronomy Daily the Podcast'. Available wherever you get podcasts or stream from their website at https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/
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    54m 2s
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    #409-410 Premium: Eclipses, Auroras, and the Stellar Black Hole Record Breaker

    18 APR 2024 · Prepare to journey through the cosmos with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they explore a plethora of astronomical wonders in this thrilling episode of Space Nuts. First on the docket is Fred's captivating recount of his US adventure, where he witnessed eclipses, marveled at rocket launches, and even encountered space nuts fans under the aurora-lit skies of Whitehorse. But not all space encounters are awe-inspiring; the duo also discusses the rare and unnerving event of space junk crashing through a Floridian's roof. The episode's highlight is a deep dive into the discovery of the most massive stellar black hole yet found in our galaxy, a mind-boggling 33 times the mass of our Sun. This cosmic behemoth, found lurking a mere 2,000 light-years away, challenges our understanding of stellar evolution and the formation of black holes. Join Andrew and Fred as they traverse these astronomical landscapes, unpacking the complexities and marveling at the wonders of the universe. From the breathtaking experiences of witnessing a total eclipse to the potential dangers of space debris, this episode is a testament to the ever-evolving story of our cosmos. Episode Chapters (00:00) Professor Fred Watson returns from trip to North America fully jet lagged (02:40) Fred Watson uses his iPhone to take photographs of aurora in Canada (06:33) Fred Watson went to Houston for the total solar eclipse in 1970 (11:27) Andrew says SpaceX Falcon nine rocket launched from Florida on Tuesday (15:34) A gentleman in Naples, Florida had something come through his roof (17:52) Talking about the Kennedy space flight centre has just reminded me of one of highlights (18:33) Life size replica of Hubble space telescope at Kennedy Space Centre (22:50) Most massive stellar black hole yet found in our galaxy (24:25) Scientists detect massive black hole in Milky Way using NASA's Gaia mission (30:27) This is space nuts. Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson (31:14) Hello, Fred. How you been since I saw you last 5 seconds time ago (32:06) Jose from California thinks black holes could explain many mysteries of the universe (39:34) Black holes could be the source of dark energy, Jose says (42:31) Question from Alan asks whether supernovae are always or at all creators of gold (45:53) Fred: Is it becoming more likely that Earth is totally unique in universe (50:59) Fred: I've got a couple of hypotheticals for James (54:30) Thank you to everyone who's sending questions. Don't forget to keep them coming
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    56m 22s
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    #407-408 Premium: Cosmic Conundrums & Volcanic Ventures: Unraveling the Universe's Expansion & Mars' Hidden Fire Mountain

    11 APR 2024 · Prepare to have your mind expanded to the farthest reaches of the cosmos in this mind-boggling episode of Space Nuts. Andrew Dunkley, your host, and the ever-enlightening Professor Fred Watson are here to unravel the mysteries of the universe's expansion speed and to reveal a colossal discovery that's been hiding on the Red Planet. First, we dive into the cosmic conundrum that's been baffling astronomers: the expansion speed of the universe. With new data from the James Webb Space Telescope affirming previous Hubble Space Telescope findings, we're left with two conflicting speeds of cosmic expansion. The debate heats up as we explore the possibility of unknown physics at play in the vast expanse of space. Could we be on the brink of a breakthrough that reshapes our understanding of the cosmos? Next, we set our sights on Mars, where a giant volcano has been discovered. Not just any volcano, but one that's been hiding in plain sight. This behemoth, now known as the Noctis Volcano, stands over 9,000 meters tall and stretches 450 kilometers in diameter. Join us as we discuss the potential of this Martian marvel for future exploration and the intriguing evidence of ancient glacial ice hidden beneath its surface. From the perplexing pace of universal expansion to Martian volcanic giants, this episode is a cosmic journey like no other. So, strap in and join us as we explore these celestial revelations. Subscribe to Space Nuts and be part of our interstellar community, always curious and ever in awe of the universe's endless wonders. Until next time, keep your telescopes poised and your imaginations ready for the next cosmic discovery! ? Episode Chapters (00:00) Andrew Dunkley introduces the universe's expansion speed mystery (02:34) Fred Watson discusses the James Webb Space Telescope findings (07:45) The Hubble tension and the quest for new physics (12:22) Discovery of a giant volcano on Mars (17:36) Potential landing sites and ancient glacial ice on Mars (22:50) Audience Q&A about supernovae, 3D printed telescopes, and Voyager missions (29:10) Zane's idea for a space-based particle collider
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    51m 8s
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    #405-406 Premium: Probing Ancient Life on the Red Planet & Discovering the Tiniest Exoplanet

    4 APR 2024 · Discover the cosmic curiosities lurking within the Martian landscape and the celestial dance of distant stars in this episode of Space Nuts with your hosts Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson. Embark on a journey to the Red Planet, where a new study unveils tantalizing evidence that ancient Mars may have been ripe for life. Delve into the chemistry of bygone Martian atmospheres and the intriguing presence of formaldehyde, a potential precursor to life-sustaining molecules. Could this be the clue we've been waiting for in our quest to uncover Martian life? Then, strap in for an interstellar detour to the HD 110067 system, a cosmic spectacle featuring a harmonious sextet of exoplanets and a dance of stars bound by gravity's embrace. Andrew and Fred unravel the mysteries of how a distant binary star system, 13,400 AU away, remains gravitationally tethered to its primary star, maintaining its status in the celestial waltz as a triple star system. Our space explorers also tackle your burning questions, from the feasibility of capturing clear images from a spacecraft hurtling past Proxima Centauri at a fraction of light speed, to the gravitational choreography that determines the orbits of planets around their stars. And for those pondering the possibilities of moons having their own moons, prepare for a lesson on the delicate balance required for such a cosmic configuration to exist. So, join us as we traverse the expanse of space, from the dusty red plains of Mars to the far reaches of the galaxy, where star systems defy the odds. Don't forget to send your own stellar inquiries for a chance to be part of our galactic dialogue. Subscribe to Space Nuts on your favorite podcast platform, and let's continue our celestial adventure together. Until next episode, keep your eyes on the skies and your questions at the ready! For more Space Nuts visit https://www.spacenuts.io 📋 Episode Chapters (00:00) Andrew Dunkley: This is Space nuts. Thanks for joining us (01:10) You used to be an astronomer in charge. Well, had to redesignate you (01:33) Fred has just returned from a trip to Egypt, and he's excited (05:48) The new Cairo is going to essentially brighten up its skies to the extent (08:41) New research suggests ancient Mars could have harboured life (16:07) Scientists have now discovered the smallest exoplanet ever found (26:46) We'd love to get your questions answered at Space. com. Uh, you can do that (27:49) Viano from Florence, Italy, has two questions for us (29:33) Having been in Florence recently, what an amazing place you live in (30:10) Andrew Viano: Breakthrough project aims to send micro spacecraft to Alpha Centauri (36:22) The ANa has raised doubts about whether a space camera is feasible (38:38) Vienna's question was about the orbits of planets (40:03) Fred Watson asks Andrew Dunkley if a moon could have a moon (44:03) Scott from Oregon questions whether companion binary system is actually triple star system (49:30) Hubble's lifetime will eventually be limited because its gyroscopes have failed
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    53m 19s
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    #403-404 Premium: Neutron Star Recipes & Quasar Quandaries: Crafting Cosmic Isotopes and Unveiling Universe's Luminaries

    28 MAR 2024 ·   In this episode of Space Nuts, Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson discuss two scientific discoveries. The first is the synthesis of new isotopes in a lab using a laser, replicating a process that occurs during colliding neutron stars. The scientists at the Facility for Rare Earth Isotope Beams (FRIB) have created isotopes that have never existed on Earth before, shedding light on the processes that occur during neutron star collisions. The second discovery is the brightest quasar ever found, located at a great distance in the universe and with a luminosity 500 trillion times that of the sun. This quasar is believed to be extinct in the present universe, but its discovery provides valuable insights into the early universe. In this episode of Space Nuts Q&A, Andrew and Fred discuss various topics including the possibility of microorganisms on Titan, the feasibility of terraforming Venus, the formation of protostars, and the enjoyment of science fiction. They also answer a question about seeing the moon during the day and its visibility in different parts of the world. Takeaways   Scientists have successfully synthesized new isotopes in a lab using a laser, replicating a process that occurs during colliding neutron stars. This discovery sheds light on the processes that occur during neutron star collisions and the creation of heavy elements like gold and silver. The Facility for Rare Earth Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University has created isotopes that have never existed on Earth before, marking a significant achievement in nuclear physics. A quasar with a luminosity 500 trillion times that of the sun has been discovered, making it the brightest object in the universe. This quasar is believed to be extinct in the present universe, but its discovery provides valuable insights into the early universe. Both discoveries highlight the importance of scientific research and exploration in understanding the fundamental processes of the universe and the origins of elements. Recent data suggests that Titan may not be as life-worthy as previously thought, but there is still a possibility of microorganisms that use ethane and methane as their working fluid. Building a huge megastructure at Venus's L1 point to block all sunlight and cool down the planet would not be feasible due to gravitational forces and instability. The visibility of the moon during the day is possible because the moon is often above the horizon at the same time as the sun, and its phases differ from those of the sun. The enjoyment of science fiction can vary, and some people prefer stories that are scientifically accurate, while others enjoy stories that stretch the boundaries of possibility. Favorite sci-fi works mentioned include The Martian, Dune, Isaac Asimov's Nemesis, Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and Arrival.   Chapters   00:00 Recreating Heavy Elements and Brightest Quasar 00:13 Synthesizing Isotopes and Understanding Neutron Star Collisions 03:03 The Process of Synthesizing Isotopes 06:06 The Facility for Rare Earth Isotope Beams (FRIB) 09:19 The Journey to Understand Nuclear Processes 10:47 The Meaning of Synthesizing Isotopes 18:38 Discovering the Brightest Quasar 21:48 The Enormity of the Brightest Quasar 23:21 Quasars and Extinction 24:19 The Quasar in Today's Universe 25:58 The Brightest Quasar in the Universe 30:23 Terraforming and Cooling Venus 34:12 The Formation of Protoplanetary Disks 45:25 The Enjoyment of Science Fiction 51:43 Seeing the Moon During the Day
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    51m 54s
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    #401-402 Premium: Titan's Disappointment & UN's Satellite Summit: Dashing Hopes of Alien Life and Navigating Space Traffic

    21 MAR 2024 · Dive into a cosmic quandary and a celestial debate in this latest installment of Space Nuts! Host Andrew Dunkley and the insightful Professor Fred Watson explore the diminishing hopes for life on Saturn's moon, Titan. With new research suggesting the slim chances of a prebiotic mix in Titan's sub-ice ocean, our hosts examine the implications for other icy moons in our solar system. Could the once promising Titan be less hospitable to life than we thought? Then, we shift gears to the bureaucratic realm as the United Nations finally agrees to discuss the impacts of satellite constellations on astronomy. With over 8,000 satellites already orbiting Earth and many more planned, the astronomical community faces challenges in keeping the night sky dark and the radio spectrum quiet. Will the UN's slow-moving wheels make a difference in this rapidly advancing industry? Listeners also get a chance to ponder the existence of the elusive Planet Nine and step into the shoes of an interstellar explorer as Andrew and Fred answer a what-if question about visiting exoplanets. Plus, we revisit a listener's innovative idea for a solar pergola designed to mitigate climate change - a concept that aligns with recent scientific proposals. Whether it's the disappointment surrounding Titan or the bureaucratic steps toward protecting our skies, there's never a dull moment in this episode of Space Nuts. So, buckle up for another journey through the fascinating universe with Andrew and Fred, and don't forget to send in your own astronomical questions! 📋 Episode Chapters (00:00) Professor Fred Watson joins us on this episode of Space Nuts (02:02) A new study suggests that Titan's subsurface ocean could harbour potentially life (10:35) There have been speculations that Titan could have a different basis of life (13:46) NASA plans to launch a spacecraft to Titan in 2028 (15:29) United nations to meet later this year to discuss satellite concentrations (23:03) UN agrees to discuss overcrowding of space over next five years (25:36) SpaceX to deorbit 100 older starlink satellites to reduce satellite collisions (28:31) Our first question comes from a regular Duncan. Hello, Duncan here from Waymouth (29:54) There are theories that rogue planet may have caused anomalies in solar system (36:33) Rusty suggests solar pergola to reduce earth's sun exposure (43:29) If y'all could step foot onto any planet outside of our solar system (44:01) David asks what planet would be most earth like outside our solar system (47:34) Wayne asked whether a supernova can cause a gravitational wave (52:36) Professor Fred Watson, astronomer at large, and Huw in the studio
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    53m 18s
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    #399-400 Premium: Infernos in Orbit and Cosmic Collisions: Unveiling the Secrets of Space Fires and Ancient Impacts

    14 MAR 2024 · **Hosts:** Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson --- **Episode Summary:** Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson for a fiery discussion on the latest episode of Space Nuts. Amidst the cosmic wonders, they tackle the unnerving topic of fires on spacecraft, delving into NASA's experiments aimed at enhancing mission safety. Plus, they explore the intriguing aftermath of a planetary collision, shedding light on a glowing space cloud that might hold secrets to the violent early days of planetary formation. --- **Featured Topics:** 1. **Fires on Spacecraft:** A hot topic as Andrew and Fred examine NASA's SAFIRE experiments, which aim to understand fire behavior in the microgravity of space, potentially improving safety protocols for future missions. 2. **Aftermath of a Planetary Collision:** The duo discusses the discovery of a brightening and dimming star, theorized to be the result of two planets colliding, offering a glimpse into the tumultuous formation period of planetary systems. --- **Notable Quotes:** - "Stars may not be on fire, but the topic of fires in space definitely ignites our curiosity." - Andrew Dunkley - "Planetary collisions are not just the stuff of science fiction; they're a reality that shapes the universe as we know it." - Professor Fred Watson --- **Additional Information:** For those who seek the thrill of the cosmos, make sure to visit Space Nuts at spacenuts.io for more episodes. Join the conversation with fellow space enthusiasts in the Space Nuts podcast group on Facebook, and keep up with the latest episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and iHeartRadio. --- **Next Episode Preview:** Stay tuned for the upcoming episode where Andrew and Fred will dive into new cosmic mysteries and share the latest advancements in space science and technology. Prepare for a journey that stretches from the theoretical frontiers to the practical implications of our space-faring endeavors. --- **Closing Remarks:** As we wrap up this stellar session, we're reminded that space is not just about the vast expanse above us, but also about the intricate dance of physics and chemistry that occurs within it. Until next time, this is Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson from Space Nuts, signing off with a reminder to keep your eyes to the skies and your mind open to the wonders of the universe. --- **Host Sign-off:** Andrew Dunkley: "Remember, space is not only about discovery, it's about understanding and safety." Professor Fred Watson: "Farewell, friends. May your thoughts be as boundless as the cosmos we explore." --- **Episode Chapters** (00:00) Introduction to Space Nuts with Andrew and Fred (01:45) Fires on spacecraft and NASA's SAFIRE experiments (07:30) A glowing space cloud: evidence of an ancient planetary collision? (13:50) The potential future of space exploration and safety measures (18:25) Q&A Segment: Gravitational waves from the Big Bang (22:34) Q&A Segment: The fate of Earth if the Sun never died (26:10) Q&A Segment: The relationship between time and dark energy For more Space Nuts, subscribe to our newsletter, and to hear more podcasts, visit spacenuts.io for the details.
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    45m 56s

Join Professor Fred Watson, world-renowned Astronomer at Large, and Sci-Fi Author and Broadcaster Andrew Dunkley, on their captivating podcast, Space Nuts. Dive into the vast universe of space, astronomy and...

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Join Professor Fred Watson, world-renowned Astronomer at Large, and Sci-Fi Author and Broadcaster Andrew Dunkley, on their captivating podcast, Space Nuts. Dive into the vast universe of space, astronomy and astrophysics as they discuss the latest news, exciting space travel adventures, groundbreaking discoveries, and unravel the enduring mysteries of the cosmos. This engaging series offers a unique blend of expert insights and imaginative storytelling and listener input, making it a must-listen for space enthusiasts and science fiction fans alike.

Two episodes a week with news and explainer focused editions published on Thursday's and our Listener Q&A focused edition on Monday's.
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